What Does the Baby-Friendly Designation Mean?

The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global program that was launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in 1991 to promote, support, and encourage breastfeeding. BFHI recognizes hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding. Lovelace Women’s Hospital is proud to be among these hospitals recognized as Baby-Friendly.

Why did we seek Baby-Friendly designation? 

Lovelace Medical Group Welcomes Molly Carroll, M.D

Molly Carroll, M.D is a board-certified OB/GYN and a member of the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Carroll received her Bachelor of Science in biology from Wichita State University and her Doctor of Medicine from the University of Kansas. She is located at our clinic on 10511 Golf Course Rd. NW.

Addictions vs. Bad Habits


Many of us engage in habits and routines that become second nature to us. Actions like waking up at a certain time or biting our nails are habits we either create or fall into. How do you tell the difference between an unhealthy habit and an addiction? This can be difficult since both are repetitive behaviors. Positive habits can become tools for survival, but some habitual behaviors can develop into harmful addictions.  

Adoption – Another Word for Love

“I gave my Heart away

I couldn’t bear to lose you

But I couldn’t keep you fed

I couldn’t be the Mom you’d need

So I picked one out instead

I trusted her to do for you

What I shouldn’t do alone

So I kissed your cheek and bid you well

And gave my Heart a home”

Lovelace leader shares career pivot that led to nursing career

At the heart of nursing is a genuine desire to help people. That desire originally led Lovelace Medical Center Assistant Chief Nursing Officer, Bobby Bluford, RN, into ministry work. “I wanted to reach out to people and help them,” he adds. “I wanted to make a difference and have an impact on people’s lives.” More than twenty years ago, Bobby entered the health care industry, first in finance and then in operations where he ultimately led as the Chief Operations Officer (COO) for a hospital in Houston, Texas.

Flu season: Who is at risk

On October 25, 2017, the New Mexico Department of Health officially announced the start of influenza (flu) season in our state. Enhanced flu precautions begin when there are high numbers influenza cases in our community, or when illness from the flu is severe. These precautions are to support the health and wellness of our patients, their families and our communities.

Understanding genetic risk

All nuts are seeds, but not all seeds are nuts. That’s how it feels when trying to explain the differences between genetic, inherited and genetically predisposed. It gets really confusing, really quickly. Let’s reference this basic chart to help our understanding.







It’s all relative: Why is learning your family’s health history important?

Your family health history is a record of health conditions and treatments that you, your partner and each of your families have experienced. This information can help you find out if there are common medical issues in your families that may affect you or your children. Knowing your health histories before your baby is born can help your health care provider decide on care and treatments you may need during pregnancy that can improve the health of your baby. For some families, genetic counseling may be a part of their care during pregnancy.

In Honor of our Veterans

Thank you Veterans

In honor of Veterans Day on November 11, we would like to recognize Lovelace employees who have served our country in the armed forces.

Lovelace Medical Center

Shalena Bailey, U.S. Navy

Amber Brackett, U.S. Air Force

Tracey L. Cashman, U.S. Air Force

Greg Clark, U.S. Marines

John Cunningham, U.S. Marines

Darren Cde Baca, U.S. Navy

Doug DeButy, U.S. Air Force

Mary Frances Delira, U.S. Army Reserve

Christine Dunn, U.S. Army

Raphael Fields, U.S. Army

Lovelace Leadership Series with Lovelace Medical Center's Jarren Garrett

In the words of a man who embraced change, engaged the people around him and elicited self-discipline to emerge as one of America’s most influential historical figures and a founding father, “Well done is better than well said.” What Benjamin Franklin intended of that statement Lovelace Medical Center Chief Operating Officer Jarren Garrett seeks to achieve in the mission of caring for others every day. “We want to be forward learning so that we can be better today than we were yesterday,” Jarren explains of a hospital culture built on transparency, trust and communication.